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of trying to join the state department, i moved to los angeles and work apprentice for years. documentary filmmakers, always non-fiction. people make documentaries, usually come at it with a variety of backgrounds. very few of us took the film route. you need investigative sense and patience and you need to be a good listener, persuasive and have an ear for material. host: how many hours did you shoot? guest: too many, 5er hundred hour on this -- hundred hours on this one. rachael and i met in new york. we were working for another producer. we were asked to produce a two hour tv special on the church of scientology. nobody wanted to make the film because i think people were afraid of the church of scientology. we did it and it was a fascinating experience. we met on that film and in 2001 we started films in new york city our own production company. host: more from "detropia." who named it? guest: i did. host: when did you get that? guest: couple weeks before sunday. we didn't have a title. we opened up film up sunday in january. it needed a title. we couldn't figure out what to call
to chicago or new york or philadelphia or los angeles, can't afford it because they're not finding employment. a place like detroit, it's a place that needs them. they can sort of make a mark. they can live for super cheap. they can have a loft. they can mingle with other people. there is a community growing. very specific neighborhoods and midtown detroit. it's become a trendy thing. i don't know if it's a trend that will be long term. >> you said you grew up in farmington hills. what's that like and how far is it from downtown detroit? >> 25 or 30 minute drive. i grew up 5 miles from the city limit of detroit. i group. on 12-mile. it's a world away. it's got suburban, lofts and box tours and coffee shops. it's decent public schools. interesting when i grow up mostly caucasian people there, all the caucasian people there are mixed now. which is a good thing. partly because the black middle class made an exit out of detroit and made it into the suburbs. most people that could leave have left. >> why should detroit be saved? why there should be a lot of money pumped in there? >> i don't thin
wanted to do more. by shifting half of the program, one of the hosts, some of the los angeles -- angele ever colleagues in california are on a screen at their own table 3,000 miles away talking. they have a different perspective on things. things that seem important to us in washington seem irrelevant there. the reverse can be true. it is great to have a conversation back and forth. correspondents based in places like chicago, we have full time people in new orleans for a couple of years after katrina, and having people in different places just really enriches the conversation and the range of stories you can do. >> one of your radio reports, so people can hear you, this is on the road. we will find out afterward. [video clip] i am standing on the ruins of carthage. this city was the capital of an empire, destroyed by the romans more than 2000 years ago and rebuilt before it fell into ruin again. what we see are a couple of stone columns and the foundations of ancient buildings. we came here to begin a journey along the coast line through libya, egypt, and we are watching as nations reb
in a substantial way by the congress. when we went out to south central in los angeles -- some of you may remember the riots there -- i went out there, i went to a boys club and every one of them -- the boys club leaders, the ministers, all of them were saying, "pass enterprise zones." we go back to washington and it's very difficult to get it through the congress. but there's going to be a new congress. no one likes gridlock, there's going to be a new congress because the old one -- i don't want to get this man mad at me but there was a post office scandal and a banking scandal. you're going to have a lot of new members of congress and then you can sit down and say, "help me do what we should for the cities, help me pass these programs." >> mr. president, aren't you threatening to veto the bill, the urban aid bill that included enterprise zones? >> sure, but the problem is you get so many things included in a great big bill that you have to look at the overall good. that's the problem with our system; if you had a line-item veto you could knock out the pork, you could knock out the tax increases,
, atlanta, dallas, los angeles -- who is doing that reporting here? so much attention is focused on what is happening in mexico, we are lamenting the strengths or weaknesses of reporting in mexico. the mexican reporters, especially the regional ones, were hardest hit. it is the once in these regional outlets like tijuana. they want to know who was telling the other side of the story and who is doing the money reporting, all these narco dollars. who is doing the story about money laundering? i do not know if i answered your question, but that is certainly a kind of push back there. who is telling the big story and the small story? >> let me bring in carrie lozano to the conversation. she is a documentary filmmaker and journalist who has done a lot of work. her film "underground" appeared at sundance. also she is an emerging expert on the question of collaborative reporting, journalists, between news organizations and citizens -- she works in the investigative reporting for uc berkley and has co-founded collaboration central. very basic question -- who is doing this kind of reporting? you
half of the real estate in the city of los angeles are in the hands of foreign investors. i am concerned about what that does to our future. i'm concerned about the fact that so many of our securities are in the hands of foreign banks because of these massive deficits. but those are the issues on which we ought to be debating, and if we can just put away the flag factories and the balloons and those kinds of thing and get on to a real discussion of these issues, i think we will have a good success. >> andrea mitchell has a question for you, governor dukakis. >> we are talking about issues, so let's return to something you said earlier about the modernization of land-based missiles. you said that you didn't rule it out that there are limits to what we can spend, and then you went on to talk about a much more expensive part of our defense strategy, namely, conventional forces. do you somehow see conventional forces as a substitute for our strategic forces, and in not talking about the land-based missiles and not committing to modernizing, do you somehow believe that we can have a
? >> we saw certain things. we had a big rally scheduled in los angeles one sunday to try to reach concentrated black audiences. we worked on all of the black churches in central los angeles. we did it very well. we had hand bills given to everybody going to church that morning. we had picnics organized after the church hours that people were invited to attend. we worked it systematically. i expected to have 25,000-35,000 people coming out after church to attend these things. i would go and speak to three or four different groups. during the night on saturday night, early evening, a battery of phone calls up was made to all of the churches saying that the rally is had been cancelled and that george mcgovern would not be able to appear until further notice there would be no such rallies. that was all done by people sabotaging our campaign. and nobody showed up. i turned out at the rallies and there was almost no one there. we had a number of things like that happened. i will not say it cost us the election. they were worries some and harmful. i did not see the main unfolding of the
, which many people and los angeles know about, but many others do not. tv stations editing be beating tape in order to fuel ghetto rage knowing what could happen, because the media is looking for another hill case. democrats are not lynching blacks, no one else is. and then they o.j. verdict. that is when they said, the white guilt bank is shut down. it ended up being a wonderful thing for america, and most of all for black people, because there were no longer being treated like children. and many great things came out of that spirit of a chapter on the post o.j. paradise. and with obama, not because he is half black, the media, the left has brought all of the racial demography back. obama does not engage in this as much as liberals in the media, but he put it out of their purity brings it up. -- he brings it up. and i saw this election season, he cannot run on his record. it would be full of the claims of imaginary racism. and so, all some of the point is not to fall for it again, america. host: one of the policies that came of the 1970's is affirmative action. to be reviewed again b
, paul ryan produced this picture of him watching the debate. let's hear next from angela and los angeles. >> somebody asked why obama did not attack mitt romney -- i do not believe it is about that. i believe it was about connecting with people. >> next up is harriet. >> i really enjoyed the debate. i think mitt romney did a good job. i love that he is going to put government back into the governor's hands and work with everybody to get good health care for those with pre-existing conditions and for people who cannot afford it. thank you for taking my call. >> on facebook -- next up from kentucky, independent, you are on the austin. >> i agree that the debate was not anything very special. romney was being a little ridiculous constantly interrupting obama. over all, not very much of a great debate. we will see how it goes. >> next up is delores' from rhode island, she is a democrat there. >> i thought that obama did better. detailing exactly the tax cuts that need to be in place again to create the jobs. i just remember over the past several years filibuster's that have happened. when he
in boca raton. a live picture now inside of the theater. a caller from los angeles. good evening. caller: bible like to touch bases on the foreign-policy issue. -- i would like to touch base this on the foreign-policy issue. mitt romney make a statement about having backbone than later he states that he wants to work with china. he wants to deal with pakistan. when china wants to undermine our economy by selling cheap [unintelligible] and pakistan is gearing up for work. i think we need a president who is straight forward on things. not turn the hand of the dice. host: thank you. we are getting your reaction to the debate tonight. daniel says -- at the bottom of the hour, we will replay the debate. we will have a chance to you to weigh in on a live in the work chat. c-span.org/chat from 11:30 p.m. until 1:00 a.m. eastern. caller: good evening. i am a couple months short but at the fed in my mind, i support mitt romney -- but as it stand in my mind, i support mitt romney. when i get out of college four years or eight years from now. i've wanted be able to find a job. i -- it does not seem
comes from greg salazar from los angeles. do you think an annual military budget of $1 trillion is absolutely necessary to keep us safe? in a broader sense, what do you think should be the role worldwide of the united states military? two minutes, virgil goode. >> as i said, if i'm elected president i will balance the budget, and part of the cuts have to be in the department of defense. we cannot do as mitt romney and paul ryan suggest increase military funding by $2 trillion over the next decade. i support a strong defense. but we need to retrench rather than trying to be the policemen of the world. we have too many soldiers, too many troopers scattered around the world. our presence needs to be decreased around the world, not increased, and the united states should stop trying to be the overseer of the world. that will save us billions and billions of dollars. [applause] >> all right. governor johnson. >> we need to provide ourselves with a strong national defense. the operative word here is defense, not offense and not nation building. [applause] >> the biggest threat to our
from los angeles, michelle, on the democratic line. caller: good morning. i think the wives do lend to the pageantry of running for president. peoplee don't know these personally and we are always looking at their public statements to find out what they are really like and home. ann romney gave a speech early on when mitt romney was running in the republican primaries. she was talking about he was on the road a lot. she developed ms. she said i have these seven boys and she said she was talking to him and telling him i don't think i can do this alone, this is really hard being here all alone. he told her, well, your job is way more important than mine and i know you can do it. i thought that was an interesting comment. i thought, does that mean he left her there along with those boys when she said she could barely get out a bet? to me, that indicated something i was thinking, that his instincts seem to fail him in moments when you really need someone to make a decision. instincts tend to help him when he tends to make a critical decision, like when he went after bin laden or when he
companies. it was head quartered out in los angeles. we merged with this other large carrier which you all know, a merger back in 1989. so it brought me from chicago to indianapolis which is a strong republican state. and i'm a strong obama person. i work the polls in my district. i'm a democratic judge. but the state of indiana, as i say again, it went blue back in two thorks eight, but right now i don't see that happening again. it was almost a miracle. but one thing about the romney ryan ticket, they stand behind the right to work. and those jobs for right to work are less paying jobs. they may bring more jobs to the state, but they will not bring high paying jobs. so i stand behind obama biden ticket. they have not said a lot about jobs not right to work jobs, jobs like -- he brought up the automobile industries which were strong paying jobs. host: right. thomas, we're going to leave you there. host: you've been doing this for a long time. have you ever been contacted by an administration. in all your time there how separate is b.l.s. from the politics? guest: we've never been contacte
states, atlanta, dallas, los angeles -- who is doing that reporting here? so much attention is focused on what is happening in mexico, we are lamenting the strengths or weaknesses of reporting in mexico. the mexican reporters, especially the regional ones, were hardest hit. it is the once in these regional outlets like tijuana. they want to know who was telling the other side of the story and who is doing the money reporting, all these narco dollars. who is doing the story about money laundering? i do not know if i answered your question, but that is certainly a kind of push back there. who is telling the good story and -- big story and the small story? >> let me bring in carrie lozano to the conversation. she is a documentary filmmaker and journalist who has done a lot of work. her from "underground" appeared at sundance. also, she is an emerging expert on the question of collaborative reporting, journalists, between news organizations, citizens, she works in the investigative reporting for uc berkley and has co-founded the collaboration central. very basic question -- who is doing th
award and international latino book award and growing up an illegal alien in los angeles tonight at 8:00 eastern. >> "washington journal"continue as -- host: the political columnist ed "the washington times." in his column this morning, he writes that this coming week may live up to the characterization that every week is a make or break a week of the campaign after labor day. do you think this week is a big win for the candidates? guest: in washington again breathless about things like debates. i think it is important. foreign policy is an area that people have to prove that they can meet a certain threshold and are not completely out of their depth in terms of dealing with a lot of tricky situations around the globe. this will be the man from the opportunity to prove he can deal with the powder keg in the middle east. based on what we have seen so far with the first debate, i feel pretty confident that may be the kind of thing where women get to it, our will say he comported himself pretty well in the first debate. it is bound to be very interesting on many levels. i suspect we will
are warning about that. from bill clinton told a group of donors in los angeles that it is not a format, which is one of the challenges that obama will face tonight. host: this is your headline in today's "the wall street journal." of host: before we let you go, any talk about the topics tonight? caller: candy has the guest -- the discretion to pick. the questions will probably reflect the real lives of people. the economic downturn has affected so many people and employment remains high. people are obviously worried about what is happening in libya and afghanistan. i think that we can expect questions drawn from the real- life experience of people. it will be a chance for both candidates to show that they can relate to the audience. it should not be a challenge for both of them. barack obama is perceived as somewhat distant and aloof in some respects, but so is mitt romney. it should be very different from what we saw in denver. host: peter nichols, thank you so much for joining us this morning. again, that debate starts at 9:00 p.m. eastern time. we want to get your reaction as to how the de
is it like to try to report on this territory that is kind of like los angeles during earthquakes season? things keep moving around? >> it is pretty fun. is pretty frustrating. it is always just a practical task of reporting on what we are calling dark money here. you are reporting a net huge sums of money with almost no idea, with minimal ability to engage with people in charge of the money. and only an idea of how it is being spent, which again picked up by trekking advertising buys, mailing expenditures. but what it has brought home to me, and i think about the fundamental issues about the speech of regulation and it all raises, and one thing we are dancing around here about 501(c)4 is that we have an irs, basically a taxing agency that is in forcing groups of armed force in my political in their outlook. you have groups that operate, go around that blend what we would traditionally considered lobbying and the grass roots lobbying and issue advocacy with stuff that is more obviously election oriented. it raises a real challenge for advocates of regulation. you begin to have to decide
. moderate republicans would be elected from the bay area in los angeles and moderate democrats would be elected from the rural california. this is not me telling you this, folks. host: an mail come and. as long as groups can bestow largess on groups of voters, the elections will not be fair. obama has proven that votes can be bought. guest: that was a nasty comments. we have to have faith and hope to keep working or just give up. i am not willing to give up, especially when there are viable solutions out there. it is up to the people to want to do it. there was legislation when they would have this copyright legislation. google got involved and took the black censorship mark over the goo on theg researchle engine. -- mark on the googl it.e -- mark on the google search engine. we have all of these groups that dominate the discourse. how do we get through to work together? go to thes independent line. caller: it is a privilege to talk to you. i am enjoying this conversation. just recently, i was watching c- span. i would like to say thank you for washington journal -- "washington journ
's move on. los angeles, california, independent line. tim, hello. caller: hi, yes. thank you. i just wanted to get something off my chest. i get so angry every time i hear people ask what is probably the most meaningless of this politically meaningless question, of, are you better off now than you were four years ago? it's totally pointless. the actual question should be are you better off now than you would have been with john mccain and sarah palin, that would make sense, we can't know that. host: what's the difference between the questions? caller: the difference is that you don't -- you don't ask questions in a vacuum. you want to compare how you are now four years later than how you would have been if mccain and palin had gotten in. host: you're actually basing that on something we wouldn't know for sure, though. caller: that's what i'm saying. that's why i said it's an absurd question to say are you better off? because you have no basis of comparison. host: how would you answer your own question as far as being better off concerned? caller: how would i answer it? i'm -- i guess
doj/hhs medicare fraud strike forces are operating in nine locations nationwide -- miami, los angeles, detroit, houston, a brooklyn, baton rouge, tampa, chicago, and dallas. since the first strike force in 2007, the teams have charged 1500 defendants for falsely building -- billing medicare for $4.8 billion. those convicted received an average prison sentence of four years. in addition to disrupting health care fraud schemes and advancing prosecutions, we are working to return precious funds to the public coffers. since 2009, we have recovered $10.6 billion. over the same period, for every dollar spent on combating fraud, we have returned more than $7 to the united states treasury, the medicare trust fund, and others. however, as today's announcement proves, we are not yet satisfied. in the fight against fraud, we will never become complacent. we are taking the fight to a new level by expanding engagement with, state, local and tribal partners and streamlining federal investigations and prosecutions and by leveraging resources and expertise. in each of our strike force locations, we a
in the past got you in trouble -- words that were borrowed and words that some found it full. the "los angeles times," said in addition to his uncontrollable brought -- verbosity, by then -- biden is a gaffe machine. can you reassure the american people you have the speaking skills needed to reassure the american people? >> yes. [laughter] >> thank you, senator biden. [laughter] >> from 2007, robert watson, on both points, paul ryan's points and joe biden, who has been known to make a gaffe or two. >> he has had his share of gas, but what is amazing -- he has had his share of gaffes, but if you are in congress to long, and ryan has been in congress essentially his whole adult life, they tend to speak in congress-speak, legislatese, and the american people do not understand that. i think we will hear that directed at biden and indirectly at obama during the debate, but paul ryan cannot talk about actuaries and cost curves. the average person -- all of us, our eyes would roll back. it sounds like some economics professor. he has got to put it a different way. what is incredible about biden, even
of our fact ulingt, staff and students, in the classroom and on the playing field. as a "los angeles times" recently said, quote, centre is a college that consistently punches above its weight, closed quote. a place where the extraordinary is what we expect of ourselves and each other. a smaller college that thinks, acts and achieves big. a place like our nation where the impossible is made possible. i'm joined tonight on stage by luke wenton, president of centre's young republicans and centre's young democrats. why, you ask? first, everything at centre is about the students. second, because these two gentlemen, who share different political views, remain best of friends. and choose to be recognized first and most importantly as young, involved americans. centre -- [applause] centre is that kind of place. a place where students live and learn in remarkable ways. prepare themselves for extraordinary lives of work and service, are competitive without rancor, are generous and kind with each other. gosh, you say, john, you described a place that sort of sounds like heaven. [laughter] wel
in los angeles and in south dakota. last night its population in 2010 was 6. that is rural. living in both extremes, i believe the rural people need more broadband, more than urban people do, because they don't have access to the schools or the hospitals or the retailers like the urban people have readily accessible. second, broadband being the problem, the problem is not so much from a technology perspective, because it's not that hard to engineer the broadband networks. i looked a little while ago. vantage point engineered about $1.5 billion worth of broadband networks over the last four or five years. engineering them is not that difficult. even implementing them is not that difficult. the difficulty is in paying for them. especially in the rural areas, is expensive. -- it is expensive. you look at a lot of the small telephone companies that serve rural areas, although they have been pretty good about putting fiber in their network, they still have a lot of copper. the last time a lot of these companies had a major upgrade is when they went from multi-party lines to a single par
time. >> back to los angeles. he carol, a democratic caller. >> good evening. glad to be on the line. i am a democrat, however, i have been unhappy with obama in the last four years, especially the last year or so with his, the way his ideas towards israel who is been a big ally to the united states. then when the situation in benghazi occurred, i felt so bad when the men passed away there. it was utter terror. i felt the white house was not telling the american people the truth from the beginning. and the way they handled it, i am disgusted. i think there comes a time when you have to vote for the right person who you think is going to be able to do the job. i am going to vote for mitt romney. host: on twitter, a comment -- we will see you again the whole debate coming up around 2:00 a.m. eastern time. about 11:00 on the west coast. here's a comment on the facebook page -- next to the augusta, georgia. nathan, a republican. what did you think of the debate? caller: i am voting for mitt romney however, i have some critiques but how he phrased things in the debate. i think he needs to ma
at the university of california in los angeles and lasts about an hour and a half. >> the colleagues on the panel ann compton of abc news. margaret warner of news week magazine, and andrea mitchell of nbc news. the candidates are, vice president george bush, the republican nominee and governor michael dukakis, the democratic nominee. [applause] for the next 90 minutes we'll be questioning the candidates designed by representatives of the two campaigns. however, there are no restrictions on the questions that my colleagues and i can ask this evening and the candidates have no prior knowledge of our questions. by agreement between the candidates, the first question goes to governor dukakis. you have two minutes to respond. governor if kitty dukakis were raped and murdered, would you favor an irrevocable death penalty for the killer? >> no, i don't, bernard. and i think you know i opposed the death penalty. i don't see any evidence that it's a deterrent and i think there are better an more effective ways to deal with violent crimes. we've done so in my own state. it's one of the reasons why we've ha
at the university of california at los angeles. and you have already met richard kahlenberg of the century foundation. please welcome our panelists. [applause] by way of getting us started, i am going to ask each of our panelists, if they will react to presentation and the information contained in his report as a way of getting started for our conversation. we will start with mr. connerly. >> thank you for inviting me. i was very impressed by the report, as well as your presentation. i recall very distinctly when i graduated from college in 1962 -- the anxiety that i had about entering the work force, wondering whether i would be given a fair chance to apply and be hired. a year later, affirmative action came along and the anxiety that i had was quieted substantially because i thought that i would get that fair chance. that same anxiety is there today for a large number of students to sense the demise of race- based affirmative action, so i think it is fitting that the century foundation released this document to kind of quiet people who are wondering about where we go from here. make no m
our work then right here at u.s.c. academic window to the world. us just supporters of los angeles exports goods around the world, u.s.c. constantly exporting brilliant and innovative ideas around the globe. u.s.c. has gloried past but also envisions a path into the future, faculty and students learn to innovate and improve and experiment and take risks to response to the new circumstances and challenges. in all fields, u.s.c. research has the respect of the world because u.s.c. never fails to bring the best minds together without cares for ideology or ways of the past. this is rightfully a proud institution and i am so proud to have you as my partner. [applause] i assume my chair at the governor downey state and policy, i cannot help but think of governor downey's vision and not only helping found this great university but also his vision as governor of the state of california. governor downey took on special interests way back in 1860's when they tried to monopolize the san francisco waterfront. he signed also against many of thinks fellow democrats when he placed california form
in chicago. it was headquartered in los angeles. we merged with this other large carriers, which you all know, a merger back in 1989. it brought me from chicago to minneapolis, which is a strong republican state. -- indianapolis, which is a strong republican states. i am a strong obama person. i worked the polls in my district. i am a democratic judge. but the state of indiana, as i say again, it went blue in 2008. but right now, i do not see that happening again. it was almost a miracle. but one thing about the rodney/trying to get to -- the mitt romney and paul reiser and ticket, they are standing behind the right to work. and those jobs are lower paying jobs. they may bring more jobs to this day, but they will not bring higher-paying jobs. i stand behind obama/biden ticket. they have set a lot about jobs, not the right to work jobs provided he brought of the automobile -- not a right to work js. he brought up the automobile industry, which are strong paying jobs. host: we are going to leave it there. mr. darden, you have been doing this for a long time at bls. have you ever been contacted
of neighboring communities, all the way to the city of los angeles. i've called for two congressional hearings as soon as possible into the matter of the salt and sea. but dr. ruiz, this thing you're bickering about bickering is getting old. i'd like to point to people -- >> time, congresswoman. >> thank you. >> dr. ruiz, you have 30 seconds. >> yes. this is another example of a failed promise and failure to lead. she's had 14 years and we see she is still talking about the same thing. nothing has happened. nothing has got done. the other thing is -- and i think one of the reasons is because you're so out of touch, you're so out of sight. you're harder to find than waldo unless people pay to see you. it's very difficult. so we have to make sure that we have true leadership and bring people together in a forum, you know, so that we can start solving this problem. >> all right, thank you so much. we're continuing along now. erica with the next question. >> congresswoman, the tenor much the campaign has certainly changed in recent weeks. dr. ruiz's campaign has painted you as an out of tutch beau
on this territory that this kind of like los angeles during earthquakes season? things just keep moving around. >> it is pretty fun, but it is also pretty frustrating. it is always the practical task of reporting on dark money, you are reporting about huge sums of money with almost no idea of where it comes from with minimal ability to engage with the people in charge of the money. and only a partial knowledge of how it is being spent. weds it has brought home to me and i think a lot about some of the fundamental issues of speech and regulation, one thing we're dancing around your -- around here, but we have an irs which is a taxing agency that is enforcing groups increasingly political in their outlook, you have groups that operate and cycle a round that blend lobbying and grass-roots lobbying and issue advocacy with stuff that is more obviously election oriented. the race is a challenge for advocates or regulation because you have to decide how to classify different kinds of speech, how do regulated, how was a different from any issue ad. i do not think it is possible to do, but the sense i
's hear from tyson in los angeles on our republican line. good morning. caller: happy birthday to you, libby. host: are you watching the debate? caller: absolutely. it is the two candidates day in court, so to speak, meeting face-to-face group politics. no teleprompters. get true face to face questions and answers. host: what do you hope to learn from the debate? are you watching to root for your candidate or watching to learn something? caller: i'm always wanting to learn and listening to learn, but i have to see these two candidates face to face without admitting everything they have to say -- without ad-libbing. we have only seen speeches and commercials. this is a true presidential debate which i cherished and i hope to learn a lot. host: happy birthday to you. dale.dayo will you be watching? caller: i will. i want to see what romney is about and what is going to do. host: have you made up your mind? caller: not really. host: john is on the independent line from maine. caller: yes, i will be watching. i'm a student of human nature, that's all. politicians will always be politician
that maryland gov. martin o'malley and los angeles mayor antonio villaraigosa will be among those working the spin room for president obama. the president will be the one to get the first question tonight. both candidates will get rehearsal time. there will be no press coverage of that. >> i will be right here, and you know what -- >> we remind you again that coverage of tonight's debate will start at 7:00, with a preview program. the 90-minute debate will start at 9:00 with the several reairs afterwards. we will be looking for your reaction, your phone calls, and females, andt -- emails, and tweets. you can listen on c-span radio and follow online at c-span.org. and as we leave at the ritchie center in denver, we are live at the wilson center in the nation's capital. former secretary of state henry kissinger will be discussing u.s.-china relations. he will also previewed the agenda of the 18th national congress of china. november 8, china will have new communist political party leadership did what will that mean for the u.s.? we will find out this afternoon during this discussion. we und
as a community and we had millions of people in chicago and los angeles and new york, all over the country. we did not have the infrastructure to be able to consolidate to what we were doing to be effective. you spoke a moment ago about an insider-outsider game. we have devolved into that now. we have to have people on the inside, the outside, pushing the insiders and getting information from the insiders sold weekend be more effective at all times. it is like anything else. we evolve. the leadership was there. we did not know how to put it altogether. connoisseurs' about forging alliances with other people and other were dozens, and why? they work. people of color are 33% of the american population. 33%. that is a lot of soap we are buying. what we need to do is commercialize it into something that is good for us all politically. >> we may not be able to elect someone now, but we can prevent someone from being elected, and that seems like what we are doing now. we can prevent somebody from being elected to was worse. we need a real education on the dream act. it is tough. it will not be easy
will be in los angeles for a few days doing it book signing in pomona. and a book signing in philadelphia on october 25. and a book signing in new york on november 1. i do not like to travel. host: this book is focusing on race. how our audience is reacting? guest: the entire mainstream media is pretending this book does not exist. i got more attention with my first book when i was working at a law firm. this is a more aggressive attack on the mainstream media then my second book was. i think they do not want people to read it. host: thank you for being here. the book is called "mugged." ann coulter has it web page and it twitter feed. thank you for being here. the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.8%. what is your reaction to this for the country and politically? guest: for the country, any drop in those numbers is important. i think joblessness is the real crisis. i worry. i think president obama did save this country from the great depression. his advisers did not foresee the great dropped. the programs were not as scale to deal with the jobless this we see today. i worry about -- thi
presidential debate, killing an audience in los angeles that included many celebrities in acting and movies, that he did not always performed flawlessly night after night, like them. -- telling the audience. the president is on a fund- raising tour of california where the cost to attend last night's dinner with $25,000 per person. republican presidential nominee mitt romney focuses on foreign policy today. he is proposing that the u.s. take a more assertive role in syria, put conditions on aid to egypt, and tighten sanctions on iran. you can hear romney's remarks on c-span radio or watch the event on c-span. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. [video clip] >> one of the things i've heard from a number of companies and individuals i've met with his the fcc has sometimes not acted appropriately with respect to issues important to the committee or delaying actions on other issues. i wanted to think about different ways the commission could speed up its process. one of the keep things the commission can and should do is to enable more dynamic industry by getting more spectru
communities, all the way to the city of los angeles. i've called for two congressional hearings as soon as possible into the matter of the salt and sea. the salt and sea. but dr. ruiz, this thing you're bickering about bickering is getting old. i'd like to point to people -- >> time, congresswoman. >> thank you. >> dr. ruiz, you have 30 seconds. >> yes. this is another example of a failed promise and failure to lead. she's had 14 years and we see she is still talking about the same thing. nothing has happened. nothing has got done. the other thing is -- and i think one of the reasons is because you're so out of touch, you're so out of sight. you're harder to find than waldo unless people pay to see you. it's very difficult. so we have to make sure that we have true leadership and bring people together in a forum, you know, so that we can start solving this problem. >> all right, thank you so much. we're continuing along now. erica with the next question. >> congresswoman, the tenor much the campaign has certainly changed in recent weeks. dr. ruiz's campaign has painted you as an out-of-
on to friday from los angeles, california. caller: i do not think they do matter. people believe what they want to believe. i remember when my political philosophy changed. i said, now, all people have to do is find out about free enterprise and how it works. people will realize it is the way to go. no. politics is almost like a religious belief to some people. you can point out any facts he went to and they will ignore them. i will admit that comes from both sides. people do not vote on facts, they vote on the motion. the vote on some kind of family tradition or racial or religious tradition for whatever reasons jews vote democrats. i wish facts did matter, but most people do not care. host: what facts do you think they're being ignored? caller: when you make regulations on an economy and pretend that will not hurt the economy. when you put regulations to the point that if bankers make a loan and the loans did not work out and people lose their money, not only will you go bankrupt, but you might actually go to jail. do you not think that will have an effect on people making loans? you just ign
get the question. let's go to laurie from los angeles. caller: good morning. i have a major complaint that is going on as we speak. i watch your show every week monday through friday. there is a major program going on with a company that bain capital and mitt romney own. they have laid off almost 200 employees as we speak. their jobs are being shipped off to china for 99 cents an hour. the company had earned $506 million recently of last year and is doing very well. the employees are being paid $17 an hour. they will have no jobs. after obama has fought for the people of the automotive industry, this should not be happening. i feel very bad for these employees that will not have jobs coming very soon. i and the american job market here all of this coming at the same time that we will see a change in chinese leadership as well. guest: this has been a key discussion in 2010, a major talking point for the congressional candidates. backing china has become something of a must do on the campaign trail. the support makes it very difficult to of a rational discussion about these issues off t
to be brought up, whether or not he missed any of them. thank you very much. host: cheryl, a democrat, los angeles. caller: first of all, i want to say -- and please do not cut me off, i want to make this point -- we are going to have a great debate tonight on foreign policy, but i feel other questions should be brought to the attention because there was not enough time for a president obama to get a lot of the things out that he wanted to say. oftentimes i hear that other people call in from other parties and they act as if president obama has no sense of foreign-policy, and even though so far mitt romney has not had any experience. i would rather take someone who has had two years of experience in this over someone who has no experience at all. another point i would like to bring is the debate that went on last tuesday, when president romney was doing a lot of talking, they did not discuss a lot of things, but one of the things -- not the integration policy -- about how they feel about the different immigrants that have come here, primarily hispanics. there is a lot i want to say, then i
that happened in los angeles that they could not report and the reporter was told not to report it. from then, it caught my attention. i have been following this since then. i think that the lack of attention of benghazi, the lack of reporting of the way this president has been conducting himself from the media. if it were not from reporters like yourself or try to report and to the right thing, the lack of integrity in this white house, i'm just really disgusted that it would not give the people we chance to honestly look at this guy without them she being who they want in the white house. i am very angry about it -- without them shaping who they want in the white house. i am very angry about it. guest: you have only two conclusions you can reach. number one, the press -- the public just does not know how bad this guy's programs are and how false he is. if the public knew, they would throw him out of office. but they don't know because the truth is being cloaked by the press. the other solution is that maybe the public knows and just does not care. it is possible that that is true. i don't k
a freight train through chicago as it does to glt it from los angeles to chicago, and that our airports and highways and bridges and all of the -- do you buy that argument? >> i'm from a town where the major bridge collapsed because of pigeon poop. yes, i do agree. jeez, we may be in a developing country. >> yeah, right. but, i mean, the next question is there a government role there? people are calling for infrastructure spending. that will mean not only construction jobs, but -- >> i got a great example. my parents were always wise enough to get me out of town in the summer. so a lot of it was spent in the boundary waters of minnesota. there is a light house there called the split rock light house. and the reason i chose that for my little business is it's a perfect example, in the absence of the investment in that lighthouse, no individual company would have invested in that, you wouldn't have opened up either the iron ranch for the u.s. steel industry or the wheat lands on both sides of the u.s. and canadian border to world trade. you needed the lighthouse. that is the sort of inves
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